How to Pronounce Designer Names 101

Just in time for the start of #NYFW, the staff at Harper’s Bazaar was kind enough to compile an introductory list of designer names that the average person may have a tough time pronouncing…whose show am I watching again??

Anna Sui: anna swee

Ann Demeulemeester: ann de-mule-eh-meester

Azzedine Alaia: azz-eh-deen ah-lie-ah

Badgley Mischka: badge-lee meesh-kah

Balenciaga: bah-len-see-ah-gah

Balmain: bahl-mahhhhn

Bottega Veneta: bow-tay-guh vah-netta

Christian Lacroix: christian luh-kwa

Christian Louboutin: christian loo-boo-tan

Comme des Garçons: comb dey gah-sown

Dolce & Gabbana: dol-chey and gab-ana

Dries Van Noten: drees van know-ten

Gareth Pugh: gareth pew

Giambattista Valli: gee-am-bah-tease-ta vah-lee

Gianfranco Ferre: gee-ahn-franco feh-ray

Givenchy: zjee-von-shee

Hermès: er-mez

Hervé Léger: air-vay lay-jah

Hussein Chalayan: hoo-sane sha-lion

Issey Miyake: iss-ee mee-yah-key

Jean Paul Gaultier: zhon paul go-tee-ay

Junya Watanabe: jun-yah wat-an-ah-bey

Kinder Aggugini: kinder ag-ooh-gee-nee

Lanvin: lahn-vahn

Loewe: loh-wev-eh

Louis Vuitton: loo-wee vwee-tahn

L’Wren Scott: la-ren scott

Maison Martin Margiela: may-sohn martin mar-jhell-ah

Marchesa: mar-kay-sah

Mary Katrantzou: mary cat-trant-zoo

Miu Miu: mew-mew

Monique Lhuillier: monique le-hu-lee-ay

Moschino: mos-key-no

Olivier Theyskens: oh-liv-ee-ay tay-skins

Proenza Schouler: pro-en-zuh skool-er

Rochas: row-shahs

Rodarte: row-dar-tay

Roksanda Ilincic: roksanda ill-in-chik

Salvatore Ferragamo: sal-vah-tor-re fer-ra-gah-moh

Sonia Rykiel: sewn-yah ree-key-el

Thakoon: tah-koon

Versace: vur-sah-chee

Yves Saint Laurent: eve san lau-ron

Yohji Yamamoto: yoh-jee yam-ah-mo-to

European v. American: Differently managed wardrobes

You might be thinking, “Wait, people manage their wardrobes?” Well, yes, yes they do. You do too, you just don’t realize it. You may not think your spending habits reflect your country of origin, but it speaks more about your consumption patterns than you think. The two mindsets are quite different:

the European way vs. the American way      |     Quality vs. Quantity

It’s said that Europeans have the consumption habits of buying a few select high-ticket pieces per year to incorporate into their basic wardrobe, whereas Americans tend to buy numerous low-ticket items multiple times a year to have a plentiful wardrobe. Americans are known to adorn themselves with name brands, linking the concept to status-symbols; Europeans clothe themselves in well-designed pieces knowing the brands simply from the designs, no logos needed. Americans are very focused on self-expression and tapping into trends while Europeans are said to value the quality of a garment and the longevity that it can have in their wardrobe’s lifetime.

It’s sometimes horrifying better, to view it like this:

1 blouse ($300)     +     1 coat ($700)     +     1 pair of heels ($200+)      =      $1200+
European shopping mindset

3 t-shirts ($12 each), 2 pairs of jeans ($30 each), 2 flip flops ($5 each), 1 hoodie ($40)= $146
American

A few questions for you to ponder:

∞  Which do you think you follow: the European or American mindset?
∞  How do you view your closet? I.e. Curator or hoarder?
∞  What type of shopper are you? I.e. planner, impulsive, etc.?

 

How-to: Cutting the Perfect Off-the-Shoulder Tee

Does this sound familiar? I love to buy band tees but I hate the boys’ crew neck! It would look so much better if it were off-the shoulder, but I don’t want to have to replace the shirt because I cut the neckline too big the first time :( No worries ladies! Luckily, this is an easy fix with the help of a little resourcefulness.

Supplies

    • Band tee in a regular/loose fit, i.e. My shirt is a ladies’ Medium when I normally take an Extra Small/Small
    • Either a white chalk pencil or black Sharpie (depending on color of shirt)
    • Sharp scissors
    • Measuring Tape

  • 1. Fold your t-shirt in half by taking both sleeves to meet so that the logo or design on the front of the shirt is facing out and so that the shoulder seems match up. Take your pencil or Sharpie and mark the fold at the middle of the collar. The shirt must be symmetrical so that the mark is truly at the center.
  • 2. Take your measuring tape and measure from the base of your neck to just below the opposite shoulder. Take note of this number, but make sure to round down to the nearest number easily divisible by two. For example: My original measurement was 33cm so I rounded it down to 32cm because it was easier to divide in half. Take note of that final number for the next step.
  • 3. Lay your shirt flat. Taking that ^^ number, divide it in half. For me, I took 32 ÷ 2 = 16cm. Line up the measuring tape so that the tip is at the shoulder and the measurement (16cm) is aligned with your mark on the neck, ensuring that the side edge of the measuring tape is touching the outer hem of the shirt’s neckline.

  • 4. Make a small snip in the shoulder on the outside of your mark. Slip the bottom blade of your scissors through the hole so you’re only cutting the FRONT of the shirt.
  • 5. In a circular path, cut from that snip to the mark you made at the center of the neck.
  • 6. MAKE SURE YOU ARE ONLY CUTTING THE TOP LAYER

  • 7. Cut along the shoulder seam to remove that side of the collar from the shirt.
  • 8. Fold over the flap that you’ve just created to use as a stencil for the other side of the collar to make sure that it’s even. Don’t worry about being too careful—a few jagged edges won’t be noticeable.
  • 9. Again, cutting in a circular pattern (and following your “stencil”) cut the other side of the collar.

  • 10. With the front of the shirt still attached at one shoulder, lay the shirt flat and bring the flap to one side to lay it flat.
  • 11. To ensure that your neckline won’t stretch out too much and reveal more than you’d like, cut the back of the neck straight across. DO NOT cut in a curve to match the front of your shirt. You will regret it.

Voilá!

NOTE: Though all photos were taken by me and are from my Instagram, I have to give credit where credit is due. The concept behind this magical mathematical genius is from YouTube-er Petite Pear Style. << Click on her name to see the video that inspired this post <<